COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer science is all about developing IT solutions. You learn to create safe, efficient and user-friendly IT systems and come to understand how they benefit both society and users.

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

Mathematics is an important part of Computer Science. You will use mathematical methods to develop and understand algorithms and to describe the security of computer programs. Theoretical and practical programming is also a large part of the degree programme, and you will also learn about software architecture, algorithms, databases and designing user interfaces.

Studying on the computer science programme

The course programme at Computer Science is a combination of lectures and exercises. The lectures are held for large groups of students in auditoriums, while the exercises take place in classes of around 25 students. The compulsory courses give you an introduction to the fundamental principles of computer science. During your Bachelor's thesis you can explore a topic of your choosing in depth.

Student jobs can kick-start your career

There is not far from theory to practice at Computer Science. You can make use of the knowledge you gain straight away and you have good opportunities to find a relevant student job. Many of the research projects make use of student programmers and because Computer Science is located in the IT City Katrinebjerg, there is easy access to jobs that are relevant to your studies in one of the many associated IT companies.

Career opportunities

With a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, you will be qualified for admission to a variety of Master's degree programmes including Computer Science. This can provide job opportunities in areas such as the planning, design and programming of new IT systems, in IT security, public administration, finance systems, graphics or bioinformatics. You can also work as a consultant, project manager, teacher or researcher. Many computer scientists also end up starting their own company.

Admission requirements

Admission area number: 22115

qualifying examination as well as the following specific admission requirements (A, B and C refers to the subject level in the Danish upper secondary school with A being the highest level possible):

  • Danish A
  • Mathematics A
  • English B

If there are any subjects you have not completed at the required level, you can take them as supplementary courses or as a summer supplementary course (conditional Admission).

The admission requirements must be met and documented by 5 July in the year of application unless you apply for conditional admission.

Quota 2

Like quota 1 applicants, quota 2 applicants must have passed a qualifying examination, and they must also fulfil the specific admission requirements above.

Quota 2 applicants are individually evaluated on the basis of:

  1. a grade average calculated on the basis of the particularly relevant subjects (Quota 2 subjects), listed below
  2. other particularly relevant documented qualifications.

Read more about Aarhus University's quota 2 criteria.

Quota 2 subjects:

  • Mathematics A

Admission 2018

In 2018 a new entry requirement is introduced. To apply for admission in 2018 you must have at least 7.0 grade average in the qualifying examination and at least 7.0 grade average in Mathematics A.

Entrance examination

Applicants who do not meet or do not expect to meet the grade requirement of minimum 7.0 in Mathematics and an average of 7.0 in the qualifying examination, may apply for admission via an entrance examination. A passed entrance examination is equated with both grade requirements.

For applicants who wish to participate in an entrance examination, the application deadline is 15 March 12.00 (midday)

Quota 2 criteria

If there are more qualified applicants than the number of places, the following criteria will be included in the assessment of applications:

• Score from admission test

• Average in Mathematics

• Average in the qualifying examination.

Programme structure

Academic regulations

Here you can find the academic regulations for the Bachelor’s degree programme in computer science. Here you can find more information about the content of the individual subjects, the structure of the degree programme and the demands that will be made of you as a student. You can also read about the types of exams and the exam requirements.

In the study programme diagram for the Bachelor’s degree in computer science you can click on the various subjects to read the individual course descriptions.


 

Student life

Combination of lectures and exercises.

The lectures at computer science are held for large groups of students in auditoriums, while the exercises take place in classes of about 25 students under the supervision of a student teacher. In lectures, your teachers will review the theory, while the exercises are used to elaborate on the theory and to solve tasks, usually together with your study group. 

Studying on the Computer Science programme 

A basic introduction to mathematics is an important part of the degree programme. You will be using mathematical methods when you e.g. have to develop and understand efficient algorithms or describe the security of computer programs. Mathematics will therefore be a large part of the basis for the degree programme. At the start of the degree programme there are around 20 hours of scheduled lessons a week, and you should expect to spend at least as much time on preparation, both independently and in your study group. For your preparation you can visit the study café, where a student teacher is ready to help.

A typical timetable for a week during the first semester could look like this: 

Monday
8–10: Calculus beta (theoretical exercises)
12–14: Study café
14–16: Foundations of Algorithms and Data Structures (lecture) 

Tuesday
8–10: Introduction to Programming (theoretical exercises)
10-12: Study café
14-16: Introduction to Programming (lecture)

Wednesday
9-12: Foundations of Algorithms and Data Structures (theoretical exercises)
12-14: Calculus beta (lecture)
14-16: Study café

Thursday
8-10: Introduction to Programming (theoretical exercises)
10-12: Study café
12–14: Foundations of Algorithms and Data Structures (lecture)
14–17: Calculus beta (laboratory work) 

Friday
8–10: Introduction to Programming (lecture)
10-12: Study café
12–14: Calculus beta (lecture) 

During your first year you will meet both fresher reps and mentors to give you a good start - both academically and socially. 

Choose subjects that match your interests

At the Bachelor's degree programme you will learn the basic computer science disciplines, such as algorithms, programming languages, databases, security and interaction design. This provides the foundation for a Master's degree, where you can specialise in e.g. Multimedia, Cryptology and Security or Algorithms.

Social initiatives at Computer Science

At the Friday bar you can meet your classmates and teachers away from the classroom. There are also active student associations who both hold academic and social events throughout the year. For example students from Computer Science host the event AUhack each year - one of the biggest hackathons in Scandinavia.

Follow the student life at Aarhus University

-experienced, photographed and filmed by the students themselves.

With thousands of pictures #yourniversity gives insight into the everyday life as a student at AU; the parties, procrastination, exams and all the other ways you’ll spend your time at university.

 

The photos belong to the users, shared with #Yourniversity, #AarhusUni and course-specific AU-hashtags.

Career

Job functions for MA/MSc grads

The diagram shows the kinds of jobs and job functions available to graduates of the corresponding MA/MSc programme, based on the 2013/14 AU employment survey.

Student jobs can kick-start your career

There is not far from theory to practice at computer science. You can make use of the knowledge you gain straight away and you have good opportunities to be a student programmer, student teacher or to find another relevant student job. Many of the research projects make use of student programmers, giving you the chance to get acquainted with the latest research. Other students find work in private companies and because computer science is located in the IT City Katrinebjerg, there are many IT companies with jobs that are relevant to your studies.

Developer, researcher or teacher?

Because computers and information technology is found in all parts of society, computer science opens the door to many different job opportunities with very different job descriptions - typical jobs involve working on the design and development (programming) of new systems as a computer developer. You could also work as a consultant, manager or project manager, as an upper secondary school teacher or as a researcher.

Private companies are looking for computer scientists

Many computer scientists end up working in private companies. Both in general software houses or companies specialising in IT security, medical technology, public administration, banking/finance, graphics, bioinformatics and much more. In addition, quite a few computer scientists have successfully started their own business and are now themselves employing other computer scientists.