PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology is the study of human beings and interpersonal relationships. You learn about human thinking, feelings and emotions, motives and willpower.

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

The Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology builds on academic and theoretical approaches to psychology. The programme provides you with the academic foundation needed to work with other people as a graduate psychologist.

Studying psychology at Aarhus University

The teaching on the Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology is a mix of lectures and classroom instruction in small groups, where you do presentations, participate in discussions and work on projects with your study group. Psychology is a theoretical degree programme which includes auxiliary subjects such as statistics and biological psychology as well as subject areas such as philosophy, psychiatry and research dissemination.

Where your future begins

The Bachelor’s degree programme provides you with a firm grounding in psychology and provides you with a scientific basis for your future work in the field. As part of the programme, you are taught subjects such as social psychology and personality psychology, cognitive and learning psychology, developmental psychology, work psychology, clinical psychology and educational psychology.

Career opportunities

To practise as a psychologist, you must have a Master’s degree in psychology. Most graduates from the Bachelor’s degree programme therefore go on to do a Master’s degree in psychology, which is a practically oriented advanced studies programme. It allows you to specialise within certain fields of psychology and pursue a wide variety of career opportunities as a psychologist.

Admission requirements

Admission area number: 22420

To be eligible for admission to this degree programme, you must fulfil the following requirements:

qualifying examination as well as the following specific admission requirements (A, B and C refers to the subject level in the Danish upper secondary school with A being the highest level possible):

  • Danish A
  • English B
  • Mathematics B
  • History B or History of Ideas B or Social Science B or Contemporary History B

 

If there are any subjects you have not completed at the required level, you can take them as supplementary courses or as a summer supplementary course (conditional Admission).

The admission requirements must be met and documented by 5 July in the year of application unless you apply for conditional admission.

Quota 2

Like quota 1 applicants, quota 2 applicants must have passed a qualifying examination, and they must also fulfil the specific admission requirements above.

Quota 2 applicants are individually evaluated on the basis of: 

  1. a grade average calculated on the basis of the particularly relevant subjects (Quota 2 subjects), listed below
  2. other particularly relevant documented qualifications.

Read more about Aarhus University’s quota 2 criteria.

 

Quota 2 subjects:

  • Danish A
  • English B
  • Mathematics B
  • Physics C or Chemistry C or Biology C
  • History C, Social Science C, Contemporary History C, Psychology C or Philosophy C

Transfer/re-enrolment

At present, it is not possible to apply for transfer or change of study to this degree programme. If it becomes possible to transfer or change your study into this programme at a later date, it will be announced on this page.

Programme structure

The Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology focuses on a number of theoretical subjects. The key areas of study are social psychology and personality psychology, which looks at the relationship between the individual and his or her surroundings, developmental psychology, which is all about the development of the individual, and cognitive and learning psychology, which centres on the processes involved in building experience and controlling behaviour. On the programme, you will also encounter other fields of psychology as well as subjects touching on philosophy, psychiatry and the dissemination of knowledge.

Academic regulations

In the academic regulations for the Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology, you can find more information about the individual subjects, the programme structure and the requirements you must meet as a student. You can also read about the types of examinations and the exam requirements.

Degree programme diagram

The degree programme diagram gives an outline of the entire Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology. You can click on the various subjects to read the individual course descriptions.


 

Student life

Teaching on the programme in psychology

As a student of psychology, you will be part of a class of approximately 25 students. You will attend classes together and be required to actively participate in exercises and discussions. Lectures usually take place in a large lecture theatre where your teacher reviews the assigned reading for your entire year group, while classes with student teachers are on offer to help you understand the texts or do particular exercises. 

As a psychology student, you will also be part of a study group. In the group, you will discuss assigned reading and perhaps prepare for exams together. In addition, you are expected to do presentations together. 

Below is an example of a weekly timetable for students on the first semester of the Bachelor’s degree programme in psychology. The programme in psychology is a full-time degree programme, even though you may not have scheduled classes every day. You will have to spend a lot of time preparing for lectures and classes, and you will gradually learn how best to structure your week. 

Monday
09:00–12:00 Lecture: Foundation and Perspective of Psychology
12:00–16:00 Preparation

Tuesday
08:00–11:00 Classroom instruction: Social Psychology and Personality Psychology
11:00–16:00 Preparation 

Wednesday
09:00–12:00 Lecture: Foundation and Perspective of Psychology
12:00–16:00 Preparation 

Thursday
08:00–12:00 Preparation
12:00–14:00 Lecture: Social Psychology and Personality Psychology 

Friday
08:00–11:00 Work in study group
11:00-15:00 Preparation 

Social life

As a student of psychology you will be part of a large and well-functioning study environment where you will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of social and academic associations. 

FAPIA

If you would like to help improve the study environment for psychology students, you can join FAPIA. The association ensures that everybody knows what is happening on the degree programmes, while at the same time supporting social and academic events financially. 

Kein Cortex

The psychologist students’ Friday bar ‘Kein Cortex’ is open every Friday. The Friday bar is an excellent chance to get together with your fellow students after a busy week. 

Student magazine

‘Psyken’ is the students’ own magazine and is a mix of serious and informative articles and more colourful write-ups on recent parties and events. Join the editorial team if you would like to help keep your fellow students and as well as staff members informed and entertained. You can read the magazine here (in Danish): www.issuu.com/psyklen 

Course group

If you would like to help organise talks which introduce students of psychology to various areas of work and methods within the field of psychology, you are most welcome to join the course group. The talks are often on topics which are not touched upon in any great detail during your studies.

Follow the student life at Aarhus University -experienced, photographed and filmed by the students themselves. With thousands of pictures #yourniversity gives insight into the everyday life as a student at AU; the parties, procrastination, exams and all the other ways you’ll spend your time at university.

Follow the student life at Aarhus University

-experienced, photographed and filmed by the students themselves.

With thousands of pictures #yourniversity gives insight into the everyday life as a student at AU; the parties, procrastination, exams and all the other ways you’ll spend your time at university.

 

The photos belong to the users, shared with #Yourniversity, #AarhusUni and course-specific AU-hashtags.

Career

Job functions for MA/MSc grads

The diagram shows the kinds of jobs and job functions available to graduates of the corresponding MA/MSc programme, based on the 2013/14 AU employment survey.

With a Bachelor’s degree in psychology, you have a broad and fundamental knowledge of the field of psychology. Among other things, you learn about the thinking and emotions of human beings, and how human beings perceive and conduct themselves in relation to others. Having completed the Bachelor’s degree in psychology, you will first and foremost be able to shed light on, communicate on and critically appraise psychological theories on, for example, human relationships and conflicts. 

Please note that it is only on the Master’s degree programme that you will start working with the practical application of the theories to any extensive degree. Only then will you develop the actual skills needed to practise as a psychologist and work with other people in real life. 

With a Master’s degree in psychology, you can pursue a wide variety of careers. Most psychologists are employed in the public sector, for example in hospitals, in the psychiatric system or in the social and health care sector. Others are employed in the private sector as business psychologists, by trade unions or the like. You can also go on to teach psychology at upper secondary schools or colleges. 

Having completed your Master’s degree programme in psychology, you need to do two years of practical clinical work under supervision to qualify for authorisation to work as a psychologist in private practice. After an additional three years of practice, you can obtain authorisation as a specialist within a particular field of psychology. In addition you must participate in a number of courses, among other things. 

Master’s degree programmes

Having completed their Bachelor’s degree in psychology, most graduates continue their studies on the Master’s degree programme in psychology. However, you are also eligible for admission to a number of other Master’s degree programmes. Here are some examples of programmes students have chosen in the past:

  • The Master’s degree programme in psychology, which focuses more on the practical application of psychological theories by professional psychologists.
  • The Master’s degree programme in European studies, which provides you with general knowledge of European affairs and conditions, political as well as historical and cultural.
  • The Master’s degree programme in international studies, which adds an international perspective to issues and topics of relevance to society.
  • The Master’s degree programme in educational psychology, where you learn to apply psychological theories and methods to educational issues.