SUPPLEMENTARY SUBJECT IN JAPANESE STUDIES

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

Japan’s many opportunities

For many years, Japan has played a major role in world economy – and still does. The country is home to some of the world’s largest and most modern cities, and in recent years, Japan has also proved to be a major player in pop culture and the film industry.

The Master’s degree programme in Japanese studies gives you a comprehensive range of opportunities in the business community, where there is a need for graduates familiar with the Japanese language, culture, history and social conditions. Whether you are interested in trade, translation, media or culture, a Master’s degree in Japanese studies from the University of Aarhus gives you excellent career prospects.

 

Japan in language and culture

In the Master’s degree programme in Japanese studies, you acquire skills in reading, writing, speaking and understanding Japanese, as well as in-depth knowledge of Japanese history and social conditions. During your two years of studies for your Master’s degree, you personally shape your degree through your choice of elective subjects and practical training so that you are equipped to get exactly your personal dream job.

 

Admission

In order to be admitted to the Master’s degree programme in Japanese studies, you must have completed a Bachelor’s degree in Japanese studies, have a Bachelor’s degree in Japanese studies plus an optional subject taught at upper secondary school, or have a Bachelor’s degree in a subject taught at upper secondary school plus the first part of a subsidiary subject in Japanese studies (45 ECTS credits).

 

Lines

A Master’s degree in Japanese studies counts as two years of full-time study (120 ECTS credits) and has three lines:

 

  • Line A: For students with a Bachelor’s degree in Japanese studies.
  • Line B: For students with a Bachelor’s degree in Japanese studies plus an optional subject.
  • Line C: For students with a Bachelor’s degree in another subject than Japanese studies and the first part of a subsidiary subject in Japanese studies.

Admission requirements

In order to be admitted to a supplementary subject, you have to be enrolled in a bachelor’s degree programme at a Danish university. Furthermore, the academic regulations of the bachelor’s degree programme have to allow for a combination with a supplementary subject.

You also have to meet the admission requirements for the supplementary subject in question. You can familiarise yourself with the requirements on the Danish version of this page by clicking on Danish in the top right corner.

Read more about admission to supplementary subjects.

Academic regulations

As a student it is important to know the regulations for the chosen supplementary subject: what is the content, how is it structured and what does it require from you.

You can find this information in the academic regulations. There is a regulation for both bachelor’s supplementary subject and master’s supplementary subject:

-       SEE THE ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

In the following graphical presentation of the subject you can see the different modules and courses that, in addition, link to the course catalogue where you can read the course descriptions.

Structure bachelor

Structure master

Student life

Student life

Student Committee: This is the students’ political body, where you discuss everything from academic regulations to Christmas lunches and excursions. The Student Committee consists of students of both Chinese and Japanese, and it is a great place to meet other students. The Student Committee is also responsible for organising celebrations and Friday bars, and for showing Asian films to the students.

Ris På Gaflen (Rice on Your Fork): This is the informal newsletter published by the Department of East Asian Studies. Both teachers and students contribute with material.

In addition, there are many other events for students at the Faculty of Humanities and the University of Aarhus in general – e.g. lectures, intro days, career days, seminars, celebrations and sports days. Click here for more information.

Career

Teacher

With a subsidiary subject in Japanese, you are qualified to teach Japanese at upper secondary school. You should note, however, that Japanese is a minor subject at upper secondary school and that not all schools offer this subject. You can therefore improve your job prospects by choosing a major upper secondary school subject as your main subject, e.g. Danish, English, mathematics or social science, rather than a combination of two minor subjects or one minor and one medium subject.

For more information about work at upper secondary schools, see the University of Aarhus web site or gymnasiejob.dk.

 

Communication, culture and marketing

If you do not wish to teach, knowledge of Japanese language, culture and society is also in demand in other areas:

 

  • Organisational communication and marketing: Due to the cultural differences between Europe and Japan, advertising campaigns and information strategies are often adapted to the target country. Many graduates therefore work with communication and marketing in import/export companies or international groups of companies with branches in Denmark and Japan.
  • Translation and interpreting: For Danish companies and organisations working with Japan.
  • Cultural communication: In recent years, Asia has built up one of the most powerful economies in the world, and an increasing number of graduates are employed in Danish companies based in Japan, in foreign companies and as cultural consultants in the travel industry.
  • Administration: As a graduate of Japanese, you are qualified for administrative and strategic positions at embassies, in international organisations or large companies.

Competence profile

Japanese as a subsidiary subject provides you with the following skills:

 

  • Language: You are able to read, speak, write and understand Japanese.
  • Culture: You acquire in-depth knowledge of Japanese culture, history and social conditions.
  • Communication: You can express yourself correctly in specific contexts, both verbally and in writing, and you understand how to adapt a message to different target groups in intercultural contexts.
  • Structure: During your studies, you spend a lot of time thoroughly learning the Japanese language, written characters, grammar and phonetics. You also learn to define a subject, examine it in depth and work independently on assignments and projects.